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X1-1000 X-SYNC™ Crankset


Quality and durability combine in the SRAM X1 crankset to deliver consistent performance every time out. Featuring SRAM’s X-SYNC™ tooth profile, the X1 crankset is engineered for complete chain control. Each tooth’s thickness is CNC machined to work seamlessly with the chain’s inner and outer links. And with five available chainrings, you can personalize your gear range to match the way you ride.

  • CNC machined 7075, two-tone anodized X-SYNC™ chainring—an integral component of the SRAM 1x™ drivetrain
  • X-SYNC™ tall, square tooth design provides maximum chain control
  • Sharp, narrow tooth profile and rounded chamfer edges help manage a deflected chain
  • Mud-clearing recesses for the inner chain links and rollers
  • 6000 series forged aluminum arms
  • Fat bike crank option
  • BOOST 148 compatible

USD: $199 - $239
Euro: €177 - €212
Euro MSRP includes VAT

Some variations of this product featured on this page are not available for purchase and are installed on bicycles as original equipment only. See your dealer for details.

*Maximum Suggested Retail Price

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Specifications for X1-1000 X-SYNC™ Crankset

Arm Material6000 series forged aluminum arms with forged aluminum spider
Chainring MaterialCNC machined 7075, two-tone anodize
Weight745g (24mm spindle, 175mm, 32t)
Available Arm Lengths170mm, 175mm
Available Ratios30, 32, 34, 36, 38
Bottom BracketBB30, PressFit 30, GXP®, PressFit GXP®
ChainringsX-SYNC™ CNC machined chainrings
Recommended ChainPC-X1
Interface24mm, 30mm
Technology Highlight(s)X-SYNC™, BB30, PressFit 30, GXP®, PressFit GXP®, BOOST
OptionsBOOST 148
Retail AvailabilityMay 2014



Besides serious weight savings, this bottom bracket means narrow Q-factor, more ankle clearance, greater bearing durability and stronger crank construction. 

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With revolutionary advancements in bicycle componentry, like SRAM’s XX1, X01 and X1 drivetrains, mountain bike designers have been given almost limitless freedom to focus solely on the performance of the bike. Each advancement demands that the entire package works flawlessly. Aggressive trail and enduro riders have been increasingly enjoying the benefits of larger wheels, but many still view 27.5" and 29" wheels as a possible weak link. Which is why SRAM has developed an open standard with Boost compatible components for SRAM drivetrain, hubs and RockShox forks.

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GXP’s Gutter Seal design cuts friction and weight—improving both feel and performance.

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A variant of the external GXP bottom bracket, PressFit cuts weight by up to 40 grams and eases installation by allowing you to press the bearing cups into the frame instead of threading them. It requires no change to the crank spindle length and diameter.

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Pressfit 30™

This is a new design led by SRAM. It’s all the best from BB30 and Press-Fit bottom brackets in one captivating package. This bottom bracket is designed for 30mm spindle cranksets. The key difference with PressFit 30 is how the bearings are fitted into the frame. Bearings are housed in nylon cups which will be pressed into the frames bottom bracket shell. PressFit 30 will feature an integrated seal, pre-assembled into the cups, to further prolong bearing life. Frames will need a 46mm inner-diameter bottom bracket shell to accommodate this system. PressFit 30 for road will require a 68mm wide shell while PressFit 30 for MTB will require a 73mm wide shell. Advantages: Huge weight savings, narrow Q-factor, more ankle clearance, greater bearing durability, stiffer/stronger crank construction, simple installation. Allows for larger diameter frame tubes increasing frame stiffness. Drawbacks: Still searching.

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SRAM X-SYNC™ 1X chain rings provide the highest level of performance and durability. The SRAM X-SYNC™ tall square teeth edges engage the chain earlier than traditional triangle shaped teeth. The sharp and narrow tooth profile, as well as rounded chamfer edges, help manage a deflected chain. To provide the best possible performance in muddy conditions, the X-SYNC™ chain rings have been designed with mud-clearing recesses for the inner chain links and rollers. Engineered in Germany, X-SYNC™ rings are an integral part of the SRAM 1X™ drivetrain.

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Documents Available for X1-1000 X-SYNC™ Crankset

See more documents available for SRAM MTB products.

SRAM Warranty (2.19 MB, PDF)

28 Pages Updated June 16, 2015



Industry Reviews

SRAM X1 Reviewed | Dirt Rag Magazine

“Whether you’re a cross-country, trail or all-mountain rider, this X1 group is a great way to get a taste of wide-ratio 1x philosophy.”

“The X1 group has fared great and despite the sometimes peanut-butter-like mud I’ve encountered, I haven’t noticed a distinct difference in performance between the two drives.” (XX1 vs. X1)

“The X1 group looks great and performs well. If you are looking to give 1x a try and don’t mind the extra grams, this drivetrain won’t let you down.”


by Matt Kasprzyk,, July 9, 2015
SRAM X1 | long-term test | Enduro Mountainbike Magazine

“After 18 – parts very rainy – races and a lot of tours the drivetrain don’t show any signs of fatigue and still works as the first test ride.”

by Aaron Steinke,, June 12, 2015
SRAM 1x11 drivetrain | long-term test | Enduro Magazine

The German Enduro Magazine published a long-term test about the SRAM 1x11 drivetrain. With each of these group sets having ticked off several thousand kilometers on their test fleet, they thought it was time to see how they were faring. The 1x11 drivetrains have been out on all terrains for serious testing - from the Bavarian mountains to the flowing trails around Stuttgart, and not forgetting the filthy wet lines of Scotland

by Christoph Bayer,, September 24, 2015
SRAM X1 | Long term review |

"During the course of my testing, shifting remained smooth with the ability to shift in a hurry or dump gears when encountering a steep incline unprepared. SRAM really has a corner on instant shifting. The competition is solid and predictable, but X1 shows just how fast shifting should be."

by Jason Mitchell,, October 12, 2015